- The Search Agents - http://www.thesearchagents.com -

PubCon Las Vegas Day 1 – Masters Group Training

Posted By David Carrillo On November 8, 2011 @ 10:36 am In Analytics,Featured,SEO,Social Media | 3 Comments

On Monday I outlined 5 Things I’m Looking Forward To At PubCon 2011 [1], and if I am fortunate enough to attend this event again next year, the Masters Group Training sessions will definitely make the list.

Comprised of two tracks (search engine optimization and social media marketing) and eight in-depth sessions, as well as a special Q&A session where each of the panelists reviewed websites and brands in rapid succession, the day was jam-packed with information. And it wasn’t just the usual best practices mumbo-jumbo; there was a wealth of actionable takeaways.

Listed below is one major takeaway from each of the four sessions I attended in the SMM track.

Andy Beal Has a Reputation Problem: Google ORM Master Class

@andybeal [2]

Arguably the most information-filled session of the day, Beal covered everything from what analytics to track to how to take advantage of multiple TLDs for your business. What I felt resonated the most though was Beal’s assertion that in the world of online reputation management you should be anti-pronoun.

As sophisticated as search engines have become, they are still basically stupid when it comes to understanding the context of content. As a result, your website copy should be written in the 3rd person as much as possible.

Wrong: About Us

Right: About [Company Name]

Wrong: Follow us on Twitter

Right: Follow [Company Name] on Twitter

The Science of Twitter: How to Get More Followers and ReTweets

@danzarrella [3]

I try to use hyperbole sparingly, but Dan Zarrella blew me away with the amount of data he had on Twitter. More importantly, he had a ridiculous amount of insight to accompany every recommendation he made.

Of all the great information he shared, I really liked the data he presented on click-through rates of tweets based on where the link was placed in each tweet. To my surprise, the highest CTR was for links placed in the beginning-middle of a tweet (around the 25% point), and not appended to the end as I originally thought (although that was the second highest).

Bonus Takeaway: Test, test and test some more. There are plenty of studies that show which days and times of days are the best for driving user engagement, but they may not apply to your user base. Don’t be afraid to go against the grain as long as you test the results.

Facebook Tools, Tips & Tricks: Building Brand Marketing and Engaging Content

@alison [4]

Alison Zarrella, the other half of the Zarrella social media power couple, covered everything from general best practices to individual techniques for driving engagement. Even better, she provided specific examples for each technique.

My favorite takeaway was her point of view on two Facebook statistics:

1)      The average Facebook user is connected to 80 objects (pages, groups, games, etc.)

2)      98% of Facebook users view content almost exclusively through their newsfeed

Since users have so many different entities vying for their attention on Facebook, and will most likely never return to a Facebook page after becoming a fan, the most important thing a Facebook marketer can do is focus on creating compelling content that users will want to share with their friends.

What is your Social Media Conversion Rate?

@bmassey [5]

Within the first few minutes of Brian Massey’s session he said: “We’re leaving the world of myth and marketing superstition and entering the world of data.”

And data he delivered.

He detailed how he tags, segments and tracks conversions across all of his social media profiles, so that he can better gauge how to spend his time and money. This enables him to view how much revenue each platform brings in, which in turn enables him to calculate Social Media ROI.

So the next time someone tells you it is impossible to determine social media ROI, you’ll know better.

Last But Not Least …

There was an unexpected appearance by Matt Cutts, which naturally threw everyone into a tizzy.

[6]

What happened in the aftermath of day one at PubCon? Well, what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas …


Article printed from The Search Agents: http://www.thesearchagents.com

URL to article: http://www.thesearchagents.com/2011/11/pubcon-las-vegas-day-1-%e2%80%93-masters-group-training/

URLs in this post:

[1] 5 Things I’m Looking Forward To At PubCon 2011: http://www.thesearchagents.com/2011/11/5-things-i%e2%80%99m-looking-forward-to-at-pubcon-2011/

[2] @andybeal: http://twitter.com/andybeal

[3] @danzarrella: http://twitter.com/danzarrella

[4] @alison: http://twitter.com/alison

[5] @bmassey: http://twitter.com/bmassey

[6] Image: http://www.thesearchagents.com/2011/11/pubcon-las-vegas-day-1-%e2%80%93-masters-group-training/matt-cutts-pubcon/

[7] DMA 2012 Lessons: Determine Your Consumer Decision Journey!: http://www.thesearchagents.com/2012/10/dma-2012-lessons-determine-your-consumer-decision-journey/

[8] Which PubCon SEO Conference Sessions Should I Attend?: http://www.thesearchagents.com/2011/11/which-pubcon-seo-conference-sessions-should-i-attend/

[9] 20 Tweets From Matt Cutts’ PubCon Las Vegas Keynote: http://www.thesearchagents.com/2011/11/20-tweets-from-matt-cutts-pubcon-las-vegas-keynote/

Copyright © 2009 The Search Agents. All rights reserved.