The Week We Searched For- March 26, 2010

Posted on Friday, March 26th, 2010 by Print This Post Print This Post

Categories - Featured, News

Google Pulls out of China The Google-China saga continued this week as Google announced its decision to stop censoring results in China.  The final decision to remove filters from their results page comes as no surprise after weeks of industry rumors, suggesting that the search giant would remove its business all together from the Republic. The repercussions of this decision are still unknown but are bound to have profound implications. On the one hand, Google has just dismissed itself as a contender for the Chinese market. Many are speculating that as a result, Bing-Yahoo, which has made it clear that they will not follow Google’s leading in stepping out of China, could take Google’s place. In an effort to prevent such a situation, Google has made its decision a national matter. Alan Davidson, director of public policy for Google, made a speech to a joint Congressional panel on Wednesday encouraging them to withhold aid from countries that specifically restrict access to certain Websites. According to Davidson, “The growing problem for Internet censorship is not isolated to one country or one region. No single company and no single industry can tackle Internet censorship on its own.” This certainly is becoming one of the most complicated and interesting topics in the industry. If you have any comments, opinions or rants you are dying to express, leave a comment below. Also to read more about how this decision will affect China’s web, check out Jonathan Stray’s article on the New York Times’ technology blog. Facebook, Twitter and YouTube Outages When Facebook, Twitter and YouTube all experienced outages this week, all fingers pointed at China. While Google officials denied that YouTube’s outage was caused by their decision to ‘rebel’ against China. A spokesperson reported to eWeek that "YouTube is up again following a technical issue which has now been resolved. We know how important YouTube is for people and apologize for any inconvenience the downtime may have caused." Fast Company tells the story a bit differently; claiming that global sysadmins noticed that traffic to the three social media sites was being diverted to services in China and as a result were subjected to Chinese censorship software. Google Wins in Trademark Battle with Louis Vuitton Courts ruled in Google’s favor in the trademark case with the owners of Louis Vuitton, ending a seven-year battle. The suit primarily concerned Google’s AdWords system, which allows advertisers to bid on other companies'  trademarked keywords. According to Europe’s highest court, however, the search giant did not violate any trademark practices. For an insightful description of the legal implications of this ruling, check out W. Scott Blackmer’s article on the Information Law Group’s site. Twitter Will One Day Have a Business Model Interested in how Twitter plans to monetize their network? Well, you will one day find out. In an interview with CNBC, Biz Stone, Twitter co-founder, said that their plans will be revealed “soon.” Exciting, right? Google’s Nexus One Outsells iPhone in February It’s quite surprising, but Google’s Nexus One outsold Apple’s iPhone in February by 16%. After months of criticism and disappointing market statistics, Google’s Nexus One has finally pulled ahead, according to 3G.uk. Remarketing now available through Google AdWords Google launched its own display re-targeting program this week, enabling advertisers to serve ads through the Google content network to visitors that had previously interacted with their site.  Remarketing had been part of Google's internet-based advertising beta since last March, and includes a variety of customization and targeting features to serve ads based on the specific actions customers have taken.  To learn more about Google Remarketing, check out Leonard Herman's blog post, Turning Clicks into Conversions.

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