The Week We Searched For — September 11, 2009

Posted on Friday, September 11th, 2009 by Print This Post Print This Post

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‘The Week We Searched For’ is my collection of this week’s most pertinent and interesting stories from search marketing, social media, internet culture, and beyond. This week’s stories are ruled by the social networking gods, tales of weight control and judicial controversy. Enjoy! Google Books: The Soap Opera Search Engine junkies and librarians alike have gotten a full dose of drama this week from Google Books, as leading copyright official, Marybeth Peters, hard headed an attack on Thursday against Google’s proposal. The impending book plan would allow Google to create the internet’s largest online library and bookstore, which, according to Peters, would allow Google the rights to authors’ works without consent and could violate international copyright treaties. To read more about Google’s evolving court drama, check out Miguel Helft’s article "Copyright Office Assails Google's Settlement on Digital Books." Would you like to super-size that? Is bigger better? According to Google, it is. Wednesday’s launch of the double sized search box has many wondering exactly what Google has planned. Why Google made the change is unclear, but it will be interesting to see how the increase affects searches and user behavior. To read more on Google’s change check out CNETNews’ article "Google Bumps Up Size of Search Box" or Alex Campbell’s post on our blog “What Does Google’s Supersized Search Box Suggest to You?”. Facebook’s Diet It’s been a busy week for Facebook. Soon after announcing their new '@' tagging system (conspicuously similar to Twitter’s), Facebook launched their ‘lite site.’ The site is designed to increase accessibility to users with slower internet connections. Facebook’s ‘reduced calorie’ format is currently available in India and U.S., but will quickly expand to China, Russia and beyond. Their new faster site should allow Facebook to extend far beyond its current 250 million active users into less known corners of the internet. Check out PCWorld's article on the launch to learn more. Facebook May Have Just Become More Addictive Facebook announced on Tuesday its plans to enter the Android Market. Their plan will allow users to update Facebook statues, add new friends, and upload photos using mobile devices. Perhaps the most interesting part of the plan integrates users’ phones with computer widgets, allowing users to dial their friends, using the information listed on their Facebook profile. To read more on Facebook’s new mobile services check out Information Week’s article "Facebook, Pandora Apps Hit Android." “What did you tweet?”: Bing 2.0 Twitter is, by now, an infamous format for mini-gossiping, but the rumors typically refer to trash celebrities and not tech conferences. That is, at least, up until Microsoft’s annual company meeting on Thursday, when employees spilled the beans on Microsoft’s planned upgrade for Bing. It’s unclear when ‘Bing 2.0’ will officially be launched, but perhaps the tweets will hasten the process. For further information about Microsoft’s leaked tweets and more about their annual meeting, check out Nancy Gohring’s article on PCWorld.com. Justice Department will look further into Microsoft-Yahoo Deal The Justice Department requested more information today on Microsoft-Yahoo’s proposal deal. According to the contract, Yahoo would switch to Bing’s search engine platform, but continue to sell PPC advertisements. To read more about the justice department’s interest in the Microsoft-Yahoo deal, check out Reuters.

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